Rich Dad, Poor Dad personified!

Jack, a smart businessman, talks to his son Jack: I want you to marry a girl of my choice Son : “I will choose my own bride”. Jack: “But  the girl is Bill Gates’s daughter.” Son : “Well, in that  case…” Next Jack approaches Bill Gates.

Jack: “I have a husband for your daughter.” Bill Gates : “But my daughter is too young to marry.” Jack: “But this young man is a vice-president of the World Bank.” Bill Gates : “Ah, in that  case…”
Finally Jack goes to see the president of the World Bank.

Jack: “I have a young man to be recommended as a vice-president.” President : “But I  already have more vice-presidents than I need.” Jack: “But this young man is Bill Gates’s son-in-law.” President : “Ah, in that case…..”

This is how business is done! Don’t waste your time reading Rich Dad, Poor Dad – maybe you must find yourself a rich dad not a poor dad and marry him or have yourself adopted.

Incoming search terms:

 

How Indians do arranged marriage in 21st century

Rajpat (the father): Son, I want you to marry a girl of my choice.

Son: “I will choose my own bride!!!”

Rajpat: “But the girl is Bill Gates’s daughter..”

Son: “Well, in that case… Ok”

Next Rajpat approaches Bill Gates.

Rajpat: “I have a husband for your daughter….”

Bill Gates: “But my daughter is too young to marry!!!!!”

Rajpat: “But this young man is a vice-president of the World Bank.”

Bill Gates: “Ah, in that case… Ok”

Finally Rajpat goes to see the president of the World Bank.

Rajpat: “I have a young man to be recommended as a vice-president..”

President: “But I already have more vice- presidents than I need!”

Rajpat: “But this young man is Bill Gates’s son-in-law.”

President: “Ah, in that case… Ok”

And that my friend, is how Indians do business.

 

Bill Gates asks a question on LinkedIn Answers

Bill GatesLinkedIn has recently upgraded it’s home page and functionality to be more inline with the competition like Facebook. However, I’ve never really perceived Facebook as direct competition for LinkedIn because they focus on different markets completely. As you may know Facebook is more of a student hangout and LinkedIn has always been a place for business people.

So recently Bill Gates created a profile on LinkedIn and also posted the following question on the fantastic LinkedIn Answers service: How can we do more to encourage young people to pursue careers in science and technology?

So far it has attracted over 3,500 answers and it’s still open and you can post your answer to his question directly on LinkedIn. There has since been a lot of debate because he also deleted his Facebook account after being bombarded by friend requests from fans. Whats amusing is how many questions have been posted about his question. A favourite of mine is: what is the best strategy to get invited to join Bill Gates’ network on Linkedin.

Anyway what does it means when one of the most powerful men in the business world makes such a public move. Think of chess where every move counts because Microsoft recently bought 1.6% of Facebook for US$240 million. LinkedIn is privately owned and there is speculation about Microsoft buying into LinkedIn. LinkedIn would be a much cheaper purchase and in my opinion a better one because of it’s business focus. Bill Gates has always been Microsoft’s best salesman and and his personal moves will always be associated with the their corporate strategy.

There’s so much more to say about this but for me the key here this move by Bill Gates confirms that LinkedIn is the best social networking website for business people.

 

My Toastmasters speech on reducing technology stress

http://www.toastmasters74.org/My friend Ronnie Apteker published a book 1999 called “Do you love IT in the morning?” and this was a great play on words because it could imply “it” as in perhaps sex or “IT” as in “Information Technology.” Sadly this book is now out of print and I remember picking up over 50 copies a few years ago for R5 each when CNA was clearing their old stock.

Anyway his central theme was called the progress paradox. What that means is the more technology we invent, the better it becomes, the more it supposedly improves our lives, and yet we find we have less time to do things than we’ve ever had before. Professor Barry Schwartz also confirmed this in his 2005 book, The Paradox of Choice.

Why am I reminding you of something you so inherently know to be true? Because I would like you to join me in my campaign called “Switch IT Off” – which advocates ONE, just ONE Technology FREE day per week. And I’m very, very serious when I mean that you switch off ALL technology that is based on computers from your cellphones, your iPod, your PC, your laptop and maybe even your television and your hifi. Perhaps you can imagine being on a camping trip for that one day where you only have access to the bare necessities.

In case you find this difficult and secretly suffer from an addiction to technology here’s my solution:

The 12-STEP programme to reducing Technology Stress:

  1. I admit I am powerless over my cellphones and without it my life becomes unmanageable.
  2. I believe that only a Power greater than Eskom could restore my sanity.
  3. I made a decision to turn my backups over to the care of Google.
  4. I made a searching and fearless moral inventory of downloaded TV shows.
  5. I admitted to myself and others the exact nature of my mp3 collection.
  6. I have Microsoft remove all these defects in my character.
  7. I humbly asked Bill Gates to remove my shortcomings.
  8. I made a list of all persons spammed, and I became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. I made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. I continue to take personal inventory and when I was wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. I sought through meditation to improve my conscious contact with Google, praying for knowledge for me and the power to carry that out.
  12. I am having an spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, an I forward this message to all my friends to practice these principles in all my affairs.

On a more serious note, research from the Journal of Marriage and Family in 2005 found that cellphones increasingly blurs the line between family time and work time for both men and women. So what typically happens is that work related stress spills over into family time and the opposite is also true for women, where family problems spill over into work time. This decreased family satisfaction and increased stress over a two-year period. The researchers said that as the use of cell phones becomes increasingly prevalent, the line between family and work life will continue to blur.

You know in life your parents likely taught you how to cross the road by looking left, right and left again. But think about it, nobody teaches us how to cross the information superhighway. This 12-step programme is my way to bring order to the chaos, and helping your choose between the ONE (True/Yes) and the ZERO (No/False). So which one will it be?

 

Bill Gates gives high school learners 11 rules to live by

Love him or hate him, he sure hits the nail on the head with this! To anyone with kids of any age, here’s some advice.

Bill Gates recently gave a speech at a High School about 11 things they did not and will not learn in school. He talks about how feel-good, politically correct teachings, created a generation of kids with no concept of reality and how this concept set them up for failure in the real world.

  • Rule 1 : Life is not fair – get used to it!
  • Rule 2 : The world won’t care about your self-esteem. The world will expect you to accomplish something BEFORE you feel good about yourself.
  • Rule 3 : You will NOT make $60,000 a year right out of high school. You won’t be a vice-president with a car phone until you earn both.
  • Rule 4 : If you think your teacher is tough, wait till you get a boss.
  • Rule 5 : Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity. Your Grandparents had a different word for burger flipping: they called it opportunity.
  • Rule 6 : If you mess up, it’s not your parents’ fault, so don’t whine about your mistakes, learn from them.
  • Rule 7 : Before you were born, your parents weren’t as boring as they are now. They got that way from paying your bills, cleaning your clothes and listening to you talk about how cool you thought you were. So before you save the rain forest from the parasites of your parent’s generation, try delousing the closet in your own room.
  • Rule 8 : Your school may have done away with winners and losers, but life HAS NOT. In some schools, they have abolished failing grades and they’ll give you as MANY TIMES as you want to get the right answer. This doesn’t bear the slightest resemblance to ANYTHING in real life.
  • Rule 9: Life is not divided into semesters. You don’t get summers off and very few employers are interested in helping you FIND YOURSELF. Do that on your own time.
  • Rule 10 : Television is NOT real life. In real life people actually have to leave the coffee shop and go to jobs.
  • Rule 11 : Be nice to nerds. Chances are you’ll end up working for one.

I don’t know if this is true because it was forwarded to me like most of these email chain letters or jokes. Most of these resonate with me so I’m republishing them anyway. And you may also be interested in watching this excellent hour long interview with Bill Gates on the Charlie Rose show on Google Video here: