Mobile Phones from 1980s

If you’re not using Property24.com, you’re house hunting in the 80’s. This is one of the funniest advertised about mobile phones I’ve seen in 10 years. Maybe I was fortunate because my first phone was an Ericsson and very small by comparison. What embarrasses me now, looking back, is how often I used to carry it on my belt. This was my way of showing off a perceived status symbol. Anyway enjoy this one and be sure to share this with you friends on of the buttons below.

 

STAR SCHOOLS – Mobilising Education in South Africa

Johannesburg, 27 October 2010 – We could be entering an age where South African learners will not require a laptop or access to a computer laboratory – yet they will still enjoy inexpensive and rapid access to the internet and educational content. At a stroke the dynamic combination of mobile technology and inspired thinking provided an important solution for a severely under-resourced education sector. Star Schools CEO, Atul Patel has been the driving force behind the innovation.

By partnering a WAP-enabled mobile phone with a content-rich paper workbook, Star Schools have created a virtual classroom that can be accessed anytime, from anywhere. Using a 3-D barcode tag printed on a page and a mobile phone, with free-to-download tag reading software, learners can access additional content that ranges from a 3-D exploded-view video of an electric motor to teachers that comes on screen and provide lesson content just as they would in a classroom.

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Mobile phone radiation damages memory: study

Exposure to mobile phone radiation worsens the short-term memory of rats, according to a new Swedish study.

A doctoral dissertation carried out at Lund University also found that groups of genes involved with behaviour and memory undergo changes due to repeated doses of radiation from mobile phones, the Sydsvenskan newspaper reports.

Doctoral candidate Henrietta Nittby and her adviser, Leif G Salford, are in agreement that studies involving mobile phones must continue.

Nearly a decade ago, Salford was involved in a separate study which revealed that the electromagnetic radiation from mobile telephones created openings in the blood-brain barrier.

The openings allowed the blood-borne protein to leak into the brain, which caused a small percentage of brain cells to die.

In Nittby’s study, rats were exposed to electromagnetic radiation twice a week for 55 weeks. While the rats’ behaviour remained unchanged, their short term memory worsened when compared to a control group which had not been subjected to the radiation.

In addition Nittby discovered that, while individual genes didn’t change, groups of genes in brain cells involved with behaviour and memory did display a number of small changes.

Currently, no one knows for certain whether radiation from mobile phones is harmful to human beings.

Several countries have nevertheless issued warnings cautioning children from talking too much on mobile phones and to use hands free devices.

Source: The Local/TT/David Landes (news@thelocal.se)